Traveling through television: Sherlock

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square

Occasionally, I write a few lines about a movie or tv show that has great locations, shots that make me really want to visit somewhere. In today’s blog, it’s somewhere I’ve been quite a few times and it’s not so much a case of “I want to go there” but “I want to go back there” and that somewhere is London. I know I’ve featured London before in this series of posts but if you want a really good look at the city, not just the famous landmarks but the streets and neighbourhoods, the BBC series Sherlock is excellent.

We’ve been delving into a box set of Sherlock, the BBC series featuring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman as Sherlock and Watson. It was filmed on location mostly in London with some locations in Wales that stand in for London. It was apparent right from the start that they were out and about in London itself because London has a distinctive look in spite of having a great many different neighbourhoods. You get a look at all the famous sites such as Trafalgar Square, Houses of Parliament (Westminster) and the Tower Bridge and Tower of London. You get to see the London skyline sometimes from a vantage point across the river to the Southbank. You watch Sherlock and Watson running through the streets of Covent Garden, Picadilly Circus and Soho at night.

Picadilly Circus from above

Picadilly Circus from above

We were part way through the second episode of Series 1 and both remarked at the same time that it was just like being back there. It’s always fun to watch for familiar views when you’ve been somewhere that a tv show or movie has used for filming and you can smugly point and say “I’ve been there”. We are enjoying the series as much for that as for the stories themselves.

Sherlock’s famous home, 221B Baker Street doesn’t actually exist in London. Standing in for it is 187 North Gower street, a bit further east, not far from the British Museum.

221B Baker Street (not really!)

221B Baker Street (not really!)

187 North Gower St.

187 North Gower St.

One of the scenes has Sherlock running through an antiquities museum. It seemed like a large place and I wondered why it wasn’t looking at all familiar. I’ve been in most of the big museums in London but it turns out that location is actually inside the Welsh National Museum in Cardiff. There are a few other spots and buildings in Cardiff they used as well including this one below, taken from the first series.

Actually a college in Cardiff

Actually a college in Cardiff

If you like London or want to go there, Sherlock is a great series to feast your eyes on the city’s streets and monuments. There are three series and only three 90 minute episodes in each. The stories are great, they’ve updated it really well. And then, there’s Benedict Cumberbatch! Arguments? Thought not.

Enjoy!

Sherlockology

Fangirlquest’s Sherlock location page

Britmovietours does a Sherlock location tour

There’s going to be a fourth series!

A Photo a Week Challenge – White

Nancy Merrill’s Photography’s weekly challenge is White. Rather than be boring and post snow pictures, because we all get too sick of the stuff by the time winter’s over and I would rather not think of what’s to come, I’m posting other white-themed pictures from my travels!

White linen, Arnhem Openluchtmuseum (Open Air Museum), The Netherlands

Hotel Le Guilleret, Old Montreal

Nimb window

Window of a restaurant in Tivoli Gardens, Copenhagen

The building below is in London on the Thames Southbank and ¬†sports a plaque that says Christopher Wren and Katherine of Aragon both stayed here, but apparently that’s actually not true. The house dates to 1710. That passes Katherine by 200 years but apparently Wren did stay a few doors down while rebuilding St. Paul’s Cathedal. More on the history of the building here.

Wren house on the Southbank

Building is called Cardinal’s Wharf and is on the southbank of the Thames in London near the Tate Modern and Globe Theatre.

Tomcat cockpit

Tomcat cockpit. Intrepid Air, Sea and Space museum, New York City

A Photo A Week Challenge: Props

Nancy Merrill Photography’s blog has a weekly challenge and this week’s theme is Props. It’s often easier to take portraits of people if they have familiar items with them, especially for children to try to keep them focused. People like to show off their things, creations, anything that gives you an idea of who they are. In my post, I’ve decided to show some photos from a historical fort, Louisbourg, in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia where the staff dress in 18th century period costume and portray what life was like in the French fortress in that era. To see more of my visit to Louisbourg, check out my Flickr album.

Declaration

He’s guilty! (Sentenced to having to stand in an iron collar for two hours a day for three days in a row. All for stealing a bottle of wine.)

Costumed "inhabitants"

Passing the time of day.

Louisbourg Drummer

The Drummer Boy

Basket Weaving

Basket Weaving 101

Amsterdam Windows

Yes, it has been awhile since I’ve posted anything and I do apologize. This post is in answer to “A Lingering Look at Windows” ¬†As you may know by now, I love taking pictures of windows and doors. This time the photos are all from our trip to Amsterdam in 2009 (was it that long ago!?)

Streetlamps and windows

Near Rembrandt square

Window Shutter detail

Shutter detail near the Floating Flower Market

Canal houses

Along one of the many canals

Begijnhof roofs

The black building is one of the oldest surviving wooden buildings in Amsterdam and is in the Begijnhof area.

Pathe Tuschinski detail

The Art Deco Pathe Tuchinski cinema

New Amsterdam public library

And a touch of modern Amsterdam, the new public library