Travel Theme: Modern

Where’s My Backpack issues a travel theme each week and this week’s is Modern.

I don’t often go in for modern art though have seen some pieces I liked. I do love architecture as followers of this blog may remember. Many new and modern buildings are very imaginative and we have an example right here in our own city with the opening of a bold new central library.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, the new central library

The new condo tower below is a Frank Gehry creation. I love his designs, and many of them, like the one below, look like someone’s grabbed them and crumpled them. He also uses swirls and curves and angles. Awesome. You can see some of his designs here.

Old vs. New, New York City

One more old vs. new comparison is a view to modern London from the Tower of London which has it’s origins that date back to William the Conqueror who arrived on the island in 1066 and started the Tower soon after. It’s been modified and upsized many times since then. William probably wouldn’t recognize it now.

The Tower of London facing the new buildings of south London

WPC: Wall

WordPress weekly challenge – Wall. These are a few photos from my travels. The first one shows bits from various walls through centuries and I love the street sign.  It’s from the city centre of Worcester, England.

Formerly Goose Lane

This photo was taken in Old Glossop, a market cross area with a church and a little brook. The cottages are all 300+ years old.

Old Glossop Market Cross area

These are what’s left of the walls of the Refectory from Rievaulx Abbey in Yorkshire

Rieveaulx Refectory

Black and White Monday – Dominion

This was a quick snap as I walked past downtown Halifax’s Dominion Public Building, a lovely Art Deco era sandstone and granite structure. You can’t see in this photo but there’s a little dome on top, too. There are some nice deco touches as well.  It was originally the central Post Office and later was used for various government offices.  It was the tallest building in the city for quite some time.  Read more about it here.

Dominion Public Building,  Halifax

Dominion Public Building, Halifax

Travel Theme: Arches

Arches are an architectural staple. Curved, peaked, they give a building elegance but they also give it stability. Arches can be used to frame a photo or a person standing under it. I visit a lot of old buildings, ruins, cathedrals, and arches feature in most of them in one form or another.  Here’s a few. And you can see more via Ailsa’s weekly challenge, here.

Armadale Castle, Isle of Skye, Scotland

Salem Common bandstand, Salem, Massechussets

The Colosseum and Arch of Constantine, Rome

St. Anne de Beaupre, Quebec

Travel Theme: Interior

I love architecture. But as much as i enjoy taking photos of the outside, what’s on the inside? More architectural detail, quite often. But not always.

Where’s my Backpack’s theme this week is Interior

Canterbury Cathedral

Canterbury Cathedral

Altar of the Basilica of Our Lady, Bruges

Altar of the Basilica of Our Lady, Bruges

Le Poulbot, Paris

Dutch kitchen, Arnhem Open Air Museum

Entry hall, Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The Pantheon, Rome

 

Bath Abbey quire, Bath, England

And finally, inside and backstage.

Backstage. Old Granada studios, Manchester, UK

Traveler 50 — Smart Cities

Halifax’s new central library under construction

There’s an interesting take on 50 cities world wide that National Geographic Traveler sees as up and coming or which have smart reasons to visit. I was chuffed to little mint balls to find my own home city, Halifax, on the list because of our new central library being built. It’s due to open later this fall and the new building, in my eyes, is beautiful! It resembles a stack of books, too! I can hardly wait for it to open to see the inside.  I’ve been photographing the construction over the past few years which you can see here. I’ll add to that when I get some interior shots later this year after it’s open to the public.

23 Halifax, 
Nova Scotia: population 375,000: One coastal Canadian city is betting on books. A $57.6 million central library will act as hub to 14 branches—an investment in words and indoorsy charms in a town with a famously outdoorsy outlook.

Other samples are Vancouver, Canada’s quest to be a green city, New York’s development of the High Line park, Rio de Janiero’s new science and high tech museum, a sidewalk in Calais, France that can generate power, and the rejuvenation of Melbourne, Australia.

Traveler 50 — National Geographic.

Nearly done, just the insides to finish. There will be a cafe on that top bit sticking out.

Travel Theme: Closeup (Say Yes to the Dress)

Ailsa’s theme over at Where’s My Backpack this week is Closeup. When I take photos of places and things, I also like to get a close up view of details. It might be a building, or a flower, or something else. It may not be super-close like a macro shot but it will show up an interesting feature that adds to the overall feeling.

This dress, dated to the  Elizabethan era, was on display in the “great solar”, a bedroom with a wardrobe, bed, working desk and area and fireplace, of course. How could you not get up close to the exquisite details? These were taken at Ordsall Hall in Salford this spring. You can read more about that visit here.

Sleeve

Back of the ruff at the neck

The bodice front

 

Chatsworth House

Following on my previous post as we head deeper into the Peak District National Park, we arrived at Chatsworth House, nestled against the River Derwent, about noon. They’re about 10 minutes or so from the town of Bakewell. Chatsworth is the seat of the Cavendish family, the Dukes of Devonshire. The current Duke is the 12th in the line. There’s quite a lot of history about the family and the house, both on Wikipedia and on the website for Chatsworth itself so I won’t go into it a whole lot.

The estate as a whole covers over 100 acres and there is actually quite a lot to visit if you were to spend the whole day here. You can walk around the extensive gardens and trails where you will see various out buildings, statues and fountains. You can visit their working farm and see some animals, mainly geared towards children. The old stables buildings have a restaurant and shops in them and there’s a little shuttle that will take you up the little hill to it if you want but it’s not far and not steep.

The house, of course, is the jewel in the crown. There are various prices for entry, depending on what you are going to see. The house alone without the farm or charity gift donation is 18 pounds for an adult which is not that expensive compared to other similar attractions. It’s 12 pounds to just visit the gardens and 6 to just visit the farmyard. They also let you take photos for your own use.

The Painted Hall, Chatsworth

We arrived at midday, as I said, and the parking lot was very full so we had to park quite a bit away from the house. Never mind, we walked over to the house, passed through a pretty courtyard and entered to the ticket area. That done, we went up a few steps and turned into the Painted Hall, the very impressive entry area. It really is impressive, with every inch of the ceilings and much of the walls covered in murals and paintings. The floor is black and white checked tiles and the hall is ringed with antique furniture, sculpture and artifacts. You could probably spend a half hour just looking at everything there.

There’s a route you follow through the public rooms, about 25 or 30 out of a couple hundred, most of which are the private rooms for the family.

Another highlight on the ground floor is the elaborate chapel with a high white carved altar piece. The ceiling in here is painted as well. We come back around  to the Painted Hall then go up the big staircase to a landing, also with painted ceilings and also some more lovely statues and artwork. There are also come cases with old swords and pistols here. It’s a good vantage point for photos into the Painted Hall as well. Up some more stairs to the upper floor of the house.

The beautiful music room, Chatsworth

Here you have the state rooms, including an elaborate Baroque music room and a state bedroom with a tall canopied bed and walls lined with paintings. The music room is filled with silver and gold pieces and very fancy marble tables. At the very back, behind a slightly opened door, is another well known sight. It looks as if there’s a violin hanging on the wall behind the door, but in fact, it’s fake. It’s a tromp d’oeil painting. There are portraits of various members of the generations of Cavendishes scattered around the rooms and hallways and there’s another smaller room lined with Old Masters paintings and sketches including a large portrait painted by Rembrandt.

The house is filled with art and sculpture and antiques. There’s a model of the house in a glass case in the Oak Room, next to (I think) the chapel, so called because it’s lined in oak panelling and carving. Also in here, bracing the fireplace, are two long narwhal tusks which is one of the more unusual finds in the house. In one room there was a portrait of Henry VIII, which we didn’t expect! There’s so much to look at and the guides or curators in most of the rooms are really good. They know their stuff, about the family and the house and volunteer information if they see you curious about something and very willingly answer any questions you have. There are little information cards in most of the rooms but the guides are even better and filling in details.

Even the corridors are lined with things to look at or have good views out over the gardens and courtyards. There are some rooms you can’t go right into and can only look from the end or they are partly roped off, such as the bedrooms and the library which looks like it would be a fascinating place to delve into if you could get in there. I would imagine the priceless rare books make that impossible. The light in the library is also kept low but there are lamps lit on the tables. There’s an ante-library as well because one of the dukes, the 6th I believe, was such a book collector that he overflowed his library. There are apparently over 17,000 books. Just past the library and ante-library is the state dining room with it’s long table set with china, and lots and lots of silver!

The last room you go through on the route is the sculpture gallery and that leads to the inevitable gift shop, housed in what was the orangery. There used to be a huge glass conservatory in the gardens but that was torn down in the early 20th century as it was too difficult and costly to maintain. Another interesting fact was that the house was used as a girls’ school during World War II and there were several displays about that on as well.

The cascade was built around 1700 as a series of steps where the water from fountains at the top would flow. The house was built in 1703.

We took well over an hour to walk through the house looking at everything and taking photos. After, we got a drink at an outdoor take out stand and sat in the sun for a rest. We didn’t feel up to traipsing around too much of the garden but walked down past the end of the house and up near the Cascade fountain to have a look. We decided not to go up to the Stables since we’d already had a cuppa and thought, as we were getting hungry, we might as well head off. We had a country pub to go to and a beautiful big late lunch to enjoy.

The Royal Oak is an award winning pub between Buxton and Bakewell and not too far from Chatsworth. They have some rooms and camping facilities and though are a little off the beaten track, it is well worth making the drive. The atmosphere is very friendly. There are several small rooms, with open fires and copper artifacts on the stone walls. They have a very good beer selection including a really tasty Bakewell best Bitter and a cloudy cider on tap called Rosie the Pig!

Their menu has lots to pick from and includes traditional pub grub and excellent up to day items as well. The special we were offered was guinea fowl with savoy cabbage and leek mashed potatoes with red wine gravy. Too tempting to pass up for me though G. decided on a mixed grill which came on a large platter filled with various types of meat and lovely homemade chips.  The food was hot and absolutely mouth watering. Well deserved for the awards they’ve won and I told them, too!

Full and satisfied, we finally headed back to Salford after a long and very enjoyable day.

Ordsall Hall

Ordsall Hall, Salford

Ordsall Hall is a Tudor era manor house in Salford near the redeveloped Salford Quays. While there has been a house on this spot for 750 years, the current one dates back to the late 15th century and it also has connections to the infamous Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Guy Fawkes is the most noted member of the conspiracy that attempted to blow up Parliament and Ordsall Hall was allegedly one of the locations where the group met to form their plans, the Radclyff family who owned it for several centuries, being Catholic.

The Radclyffe family sold it in 1662 and it’s been used as quite a few things over the years. It’s been a museum since 1972 and was recently refurbished and is free to enter, open Sunday through Thursday as a rule. The hall can be hired for events and weddings which would be really cool.

Rear of Ordsall Hall

The first time I visited here was in 2001 and I was eager to see it again since the renovations. There wasn’t as much of it open to the public as there is now. We only had a half hour to see it before closing and that is nearly enough time as it’s not very big. There is also an upstairs space used for exhibitions and a little gallery but we didn’t have to time to have a look. There’s a small gift shop area and café on the ground floor as well.

Timbered beam ceiling of the Great Hall

You enter into the Great Hall with its superb beamed ceiling and lovely leaded glass windows. The hall is set up for a banquet with the antique oak table from the 1500s, and several wonderful old cabinets around the edges, near the big wooden studded doors. The hall itself is dated to 1512. The ceilings and the windows are really beautiful, especially the bay oriel window overlooking the knot garden at the back of the house (which is where the entrance is).

The Star Chamber, the oldest surviving part of the hall

The next room is the oldest part of the house, the Star Chamber, so called due to the metallic stars installed in the ceiling. There are some wattle and daub wall fillers still viewable and the old fireplace here still shows gouges in the stone where people used to hone their swords. This Star Chamber is the location of the supposed meeting between Guy Fawkes and Robert Catesby as they came up with their infamous plot. There’s no real evidence to support it but the lane following one side of the property is named after Fawkes.

There is even an alleged ghost and they have a “ghost cam” set up in the house. Also in the Star Chamber is a suit of armour and a box of armoured helmets. There was a table with an old writing desk on it and feather “pen” and another with some old musical instruments on display. There’s an Elizabethan globe in one of the other rooms. They also have six pieces of medieval stained glass hangings, mainly “heraldic” symbols like one of a bull’s head in the kitchen and two hanging on the oriel window off the Great Hall.

Italian plaster ceiling

On the top floor, there is also a room with an Italianate plaster ceiling which was rare in the northwest. This is newly opened to the public after the recent restorations. This is normally closed to the public but you can look into it through a glass panel.

The Great Chamber

You can then go upstairs to see another solar chamber, the Great chamber, with a canopied bed and an old fashioned bath (reproduction). There’s also a gorgeous off-white Elizabethan dress on display with really beautiful detail on the bodice, sleeves and around the ruff. There are a few pieces of costume in the wardrobe like hats and ruffs that you can try on if you want. The hall is often used for school outings and they have costumed guides to explain the history of the house to schoolkids.

Back on the ground floor there’s a kitchen set up as it would have looked in Elizabethan times and which has interesting items to look at as well and it’s got a recorded voice over of “life in the kitchen”. Some of the items are of later eras such as a bread oven from Victorian times.

 

History:

Sir John Radclyffe campaigned with Edward III and was allowed to bring back some weavers to his manor where he set up a sort of factory and made his money in cloth production. The exterior of the oldest part is half-timber beamed and there is brick addition on the house as well. It used to be built around a courtyard but only two wings are left now, an L-shape. After the Radclyffes sold the house, it went through a number of owners. The last time it was occupied as a residence was in 1871.

More about the hall here.

My Flickr set of photos is here.