DP Challenge – Scale

This week’s challenge from The Daily Post on WordPress is Scale. Scale is interesting. It’s much better to demonstrate the size of one thing by putting it with another for comparison. Or, you can create something in a smaller size or scale than an original, such as a sailing ship that fits in a bottle. Here’s a few photos from my archives showing scale.

Blue Rocks view

Boats don’t seem so large on the vast waters of the sea! Blue Rocks, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia

 

Citadel Trenches map

Scale model of WWI trenches in France. Seen in the Halifax Citadel

Peggys Cove Lighthouse

Peggy’s cove lighthouse with the tourists, to give you an idea of how tall it is and how large the granite rocks on the shore are.

St. John's.

How steep is that hill? Seeing the angle of the vehicle gives you a better idea than just seeing the road. Look closely just behind the car. You can see steps built into the sidewalks, *that’s* how steep it is! St. John’s, Newfoundland

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WPC: Waiting

The WordPress challenge this week is Waiting, something we all seem to do a lot of. Waiting for the bus, waiting in lineups, waiting for the movie to start, waiting for your meal to come to the table, waiting in the airport or the train station, (oh boy, I’ve done a lot of that!) and waiting for other people. (I’m always on time, why can’t everyone be? Yes, yes, I know. Circumstances vary). Here are a few examples of “waiting” from the photo archives.

Bus stop in the middle of the Lake District

Waiting for the bus. The Lake District, England.

Waiting

Waiting in Heathrow airport

Blackpool Carraige

Waiting for customers. Blackpool Promenade, England

Blackpool Donkeys Tram

Waiting for the Tram. Also in Blackpool.

Untitled

Just….waiting. Trentham Monkey sanctuary, Trentham, England

WPC: Shiny – Let’s Visit Worcester, UK

The WordPress Weekly challenge this week is “Shiny”, or, to use their description, “Diversions, Distractions, and Delightful Detours”. Things that catch your attention and divert you from your original goal or intention, something you can’t resist. It might, indeed, be something shiny but it could be really, anything.

When I’m traveling, I always have my camera handy. I’m always on the lookout and the things that might take my attention, things I can’t resist photographing are sometimes a unique architectural detail, something interesting, weird or wonderful in a shop window, or perhaps a small and unusual museum.

I was sitting in a very old pub once, The Cardinal’s Hat in the city of Worcester, with a friend and he looked at me, baffled as to why I appeared to be taking a photo of the wall beside me. I pointed out that there was an old door there. “Yes…..”. “Look at it.” “Erm….” What I was pointing out was the existence of two locks side by side on the door, a modern Yale type lock and a very old latch. This is the detail that caught my eye, such contrasts over time.

Old and NewThe building dates back to the fourteenth century and has had many names over the centuries. When I visited, in 2003, it was an Austrian bar and defied licensing laws by serving beer, not by the pint but by the litre! It has since been refurbished again. The building now mainly reflects the Georgian era so I presume that’s the origin of the latch.
The pub is on the main historical street, Friar Street, where you will also see old buildings such as the Alms House and Greyfriars and many of the shops on the street are housed in buildings with some origins as old as the Tudor era.

Worcester itself is an old city with a lovely cathedral overlooking the River Severn. There’s a beautiful Guildhall. There is the cathedral that has parts of the building dating back to the 10th century (crypts). Royal Worcester porcelain was still a going concern when I visited and could shop in the “seconds” outlet but it’s closed now. There is, I believe, a museum. Worcester is also the home of the famous Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce which is still made here. It was a Roman occupied area at one time and later, it was a Royalist city during the English Civil War. There was a battle nearby and a defeat for Charles I in 1751. Worcester was also chosen to be the retreat for the British government in case of a German invasion in WWII. It’s a really interesting city if you’re a history fan. Here are some of my old photos from my visit there, scans from film so they’re not the best quality but I think will represent some interesting aspects.

See more distractions and ‘shiny’ here

WPC: Elemental Wind and Water

The WordPress Challenge this week is Elemental, with the four elements featured. Earth, Water, Air and Fire. I’ve found some photos that capture some of these:

The Bay of Fundy has the highest tides in the world, as high as 16 metres at the Minas Basin inner end of the bay. All that water coming and going can play havoc and these two photos from the Fundy National Park in New Brunswick of the “Hopewell Rocks” show you what water can do to stone over centuries. The tide comes a fair way up the cliffs where those stairs are and you can only see the sculpted rock from over the top of the hole upward, at high tide.
Hopewell Rocks 020

Hopewell Rocks 018

This is another part of the Bay of Fundy at Blomidon, near the Minas Basin. Low tide means it’s quite a walk to the water. The red in the earth is caused from a high clay content. You also see the red earth in Prince Edward Island in the Bay of St. Lawrence.
Blomidon beach

Here are a couple of shots of Niagara Falls. The sound of all that water gushing over into the river can be heard through most of the centre of the city. It’s quite a sight to see, even in the winter when there are boulders of ice choking the sides of the river, caused by the mist freezing over the snow.
Niagara Falls Maid of the mist

Niagara Falls Canadian falls

Now we see the effects of wind on a tree over time, on the moors in Cornwall.
windswept tree
This is a very old geographical formation of rock. I’ve had this photo published in a textbook that explains what it is but I’d have to dig it out to jog my memory.

Blue Rocks Rockscape

Blue Rocks, Nova Scotia

DP Challenge – Focus

WordPress’s photo challenge this week is Focus.

Temporary exhibition hall

Exhibition hall in Rosenborg Castle, Copenhagen

Daisy view

Indian Harbour, Nova Scotia

 

Notre Dame Blues

Basilica Notre Dame, Montreal

November rain

Somewhere in Salford. November rain.

Who's out there?

Who’s out there!?

Stalking

Is there anything more focussed than a cat stalking it’s victim?

 

DP Challenge: Home

The Daily Post Challenge this week is Home, asking people to show photos of where they live, home being where the heart is and all that. Halifax, Nova Scotia is my home, on the east coast of Canada. Halifax has one of the largest ice-free harbours in the world and is home to Canada’s East Coast Navy. There are two large container shipping ports, and oceanographic institute,  and a ship building  yard. Needless to say, a lot of Halifax’s life is structured around the sea. There are also 5 universities and colleges and it’s the seat of the provincial government. Lots of lakes and beaches, culture, shopping, food and a gorgeous waterfront where there’s always something going on.

McDonald Bridge nearly dark

One of the two harbour bridges just after sunset

Halifax Waterfront

Halifax downtown skyline and the ferry

Public Gardens gazebo

The Victorian Public Gardens

Dalhousie effects

Dalhousie University campus

Lake 022

“My” lake, Albro Lake, in my neighbourhood

Cisne Branco (Brazil) and Kruzenshtern (Russia)

Visits from the Tall Ships (another visit coming in July 2017)

DP Challenge: H2O

The Daily Post weekly challenge is H2O, or water. Water features strongly in my travel photos since many places we travel feature lakes, oceans, canals, fountains etc. because bodies of water attracted settlements. Water provides a living, it provides sustenance, it provides life to the creatures that live in it. It provides transportation and is a source for conversion to power supplies. You can cook in and with it, create beverages, keep yourself clean, travel on it in various types of vessels, you can make a living on or in it in many ways. Water is also reflective which makes a lovely photo, and feeds through fountains which are not only nice to look at but in former days, provided the means for people to obtain water for drinking and cooking.

Mahone Bay Harbour Boats

Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia where the harbour provides recreation and a home for fishing boats.

Coins in the fountain

Reflections of coins in a fountain in the Public Gardens in Halifax

Niagara Falls Maid of the mist

The power of water. Niagara Falls, Ontario

I mentioned that many settlements are on or near water. Canals are fascinating. In cases like Amsterdam and many other cities and towns in the Low Countries, the sea was forced back and cities were built on canals and islands. There are more cities with canals than the one you think of first, Venice. Amsterdam actually has more canals than Venice. Other cities on the list include Copenhagen, Stockholm, Bruges, Annecy (France), Bangkok, and St. Petersburg. Britian’s city of Manchester has a number of canals which were built in the industrial revolution to transport goods from local factories to the coastline for shipping.

Frederiksholms Canal

Copenhagen. One of the many cities that grew on a series of canals.

DP challenge: The Truth is Out There

Shag Harbour UFO witnesses

In 1967, lights were seen over the skies of Shag Harbour and Halifax, Nova Scotia. Over Shag Harbour, according to a witness, there were whistling sounds and then a crash.  It very much appeared as if something had crashed into the ocean off the south shore of Nova Scotia. Nobody has ever been able to confirm or deny that what  was seen by many people was extra terrestrial but it hasn’t been denied, either. The Canadian and the U.S. governments have never offered any explanation nor have they allowed anything to the public at all. UFO?

People that witnessed the event to this day believe what they saw could very well be a UFO. Laurie and Peter, in the photo above, were both teenage boys and witnesses to the events. We got the chance to speak to Peter at the tiny UFO museum in the little village of Shag Harbour recently.  Writers and media over the years have tried to get further information from the government but have been firmly shut down. Why? Was it a secret experiment or military operation that went wrong? Divers haven’t found anything but a cylinder with unknown-at-the-time tech washed up near a lighthouse.

2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the event. They have a festival every year in October to mark the notoriety including speakers, seminars and entertainment and hope to make it special for the milestone anniversary. There’s a non-profit society involved in this and their Facebook page is here., with a website here that explains about the incident in more detail. A true quest for the truth if ever there was one.

Shag Harbour is about a 2.5 hour drive from Halifax or about an hour from Yarmouth. The day we visited was foggy, so foggy you could hardly see across the road. Kind of added to the mystery!

WordPress weekly challenge: Quest

DP Challenge – Living on the edge

This week, The Daily Post from WordPress wants to see things on the Edge. Here in Halifax, we get a visit from the Tall Ships every few years. I find the ships fascinating and they’re just magnificent at full sail. The crews of the ships are used to some rather precarious spots to do their job. They may not walk a plank but they do need good balance and a head for heights. Here are a few photos from various crewmembers.

Pride of Baltimore

Pride of Baltimore

No vacation for this guy

Pride of Baltimore

No mutiny here

HMS Bounty. No mutiny here.

Laundry day on a tall ship

Laundry day on the Iskra

Daily Post – Mirror

WordPress Daily Post weekly challenge this week is Mirror. I haven’t got a lot of photos of actual mirrors but still waters reflect perfectly.

This first photo is not a very good scan from a photo I took around 9 a.m. at a picnic site near Arrochar in the Scottish Highlands. A good friend of mine whom I had known online for several years picked me and another good friend up at our hotel in Glasgow and drove us through the Highlands to Oban where we caught the ferry to Mull and then to the island of Iona via a pedestrian ferry. Since we’d made quite an early start, we were ready for a quick snack and a break just as the sun was really breaking over the mountains. I think it was mid April so the mornings were still late in getting bright. We had a lovely day and lots of laughs. He passed away about 7 months later so I’m very glad I got to meet him face to face.

Long Loch from Arrochar

Long Loch, Scottish Highlands near Arrochar