Fab Photo Friday – Bricks and mortar

One of my favourite things to photograph when I travel is architectural detail. Doors, windows, carvings, shapes and curves and lines, it all fascinates me. Some stonework is so intricate that it looks as delicate and fragile as lace. I’m always looking up when I’m walking through a town or city, looking for details.

In the historic city of York in England, in the medeival narrow streets around the Minster, if you look up you’ll see all sorts of neat things. There’s one little street where there’s a little red devil up on the corner of a building! These photos today are from the city of Roskilde, near Copenhagen. There are a lot of buildings and houses in Denmark that are plastered and painted lovely colours but there are a lot of brick buildings too and the brickwork can be really intricate. They put a lot into the patterns and trimmings. These photos here are of some of the buildings in central Roskilde and of the cathedral, the Domkirk where most of the past Monarchs are buried. It was the seat of the Royal Family until Copenhagen became more popular.

Look at the patterns, see where the brick has been repaired and replaced. It’s all very neat, isn’t it?

Apotek

This used to be an Apothocary

Roskilde Town Hall Medieval Tower

This is the clock tower of the Town Hall

Domkirk Side

One side of the Domkirk

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Fab Photos – Lostwithiel

I know it’s been quiet around this blog lately. I’m just waiting on pins and needles for our New York Trip, 2 weeks from today! In the meantime, I browsed my folders to find a “fab photo” and found this first one taken from the car window as we were driving cross country to the east side of Cornwall.

Cornwall isn’t all about beaches and coves. The inland parts have rolling hills and desolate moors (Devon), farms and some nice little villages.

North Devon, England

North Devon, England

We were heading from where we were staying near Camelford to Lanhydrock House and then to the east coast to see the little fishing village of Fowey. Our host at the Inn told us about Lostwithiel and said it was a lovely little place for a stop. After we left Lanhydrock, which, by the way, is superb if you like old houses filled with lots and lots of interesting things, we went to Lostwithiel which is only a stone’s throw from there.

We found a place to park and walked along the High street and saw this old church. Looked interesting and as we came into the church yard we noticed the path was lined with shoes filled with flowers. That’s odd…

Lostwithiel Floral shoe walk

Shoes along the path at St. Bartholomew’s, Lostwithiel

We went inside the church, St. Bartholomew’s (dating to the 13th to 14th century), and discovered it was the first day of a flower festival. The church was filled with flowers and elaborate displays of flowers. Local businesses and groups each had sponsored a display of flowers which was also accompanied by various items associated with the group/business. For example, one sponsored by a pharmacy had antique microscopes and old prescription and tonic bottles.
St Bartholemews arches
The church smelled amazing, not overpowering at all. We spent a good 3/4 hour looking at all the displays. This was one of my favourites though I don’t remember who sponsored it now. The displays would be auctioned off at the end of the long weekend for charity, benefiting a hospice and also the church itself.
Lostwithiel Floral stained glass window

Lostwithiel Graham

My fella enjoying his cuppa

Outside the church in the yard, they had a table set up with coffee, tea and cakes that you could purchase, funds going towards the festival and church. The sun had come out by then so, though it was still a tad chilly, we bought some refreshments to help support the cause.
Lostwithiel church lady

Lostwithiel is in the Fowey River valley and isn’t far from the coastal town of Fowey. Just outside the town is Restormel Castle which we also visited. There is an old arched stone bridge as well, crossing the river. They believe it dates to the 13th century. There’s a detailed history of the bridge here though the web page is a bit difficult to read due to poor single spaced text.

Fab Photo Friday – My favourites

In honour of the first Friday in April, a day that’s going to bring snow and a lot of rain to Halifax (typical, that), here are a few of my very favourite photos from my Flickr “Favourites”

This was taken outside of the “Plague” village of Eyam. We drove to the edge of the village looking for a particular signpost was supposed to be. We didn’t find it but drove along a bit further. The road narrowed and followed the top of a hill. We realized we were not going to find what we wanted and thought we’d better turn back to the village but this view across a bit of a valley caught my eye. The lines and the shades of green on an overcast misty day in the Peak District were perfect.

Peak District farm, U.K.

This photo was taken in the Netherlands at the Open Air Museum near Arnhem. The huge park contains lots of old Dutch cottages and buildings from various eras. This area was beside a little shack used for making paper the old fashioned way and across the pond, was a printer’s shop. It, too, was an overcast, sometimes rainy day. It always seems that things look much greener under dark skies!

On the grounds of the Open Air Museum, Nr. Arnhem, The Netherlands

This last photo was taken in 2000. I had taken a bus tour around Scotland and we’d had an early morning start from our hotel on the Isle of Skye in Broadford. We’d actually watched the sun come up over the mountains on the mainland, probably the ones in this general area. We traversed the bridge over and headed up. and up. And then stopped for a photo op at a lookoff point over Loch Caron just as the morning sun was bathing everything in gold. It was a lucky shot and remains one of my favourites.

Loch Caron, West Highlands, Scotland

Fab Photo Friday – Paris

My nephew and his partner are in Paris as I write this. It’s his first visit anywhere in Europe and he was hugely excited to go. His partner has been there at least once before and his partner has a friend there that is going to show them around as well. I am excited to hear all about his travels when he returns so in honour of Justin’s first foray to the city of Light, here’s a few photos from Paris, things I hope he and Zach do and see. I hope their experience is every bit as great as mine was.

Watch the sun set over Notre Dame

Watch the sun set over Notre Dame

Yummy pastries and cakes!

Yummy pastries and cakes!

Paris is for lovers.

Paris is for lovers.

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

A detail on the Arc de Triomphe

A detail on the Arc de Triomphe

The Grande Roule in Place de la Concorde. There's a great view over the city from top, even on a rainy day, in my experience

The Grande Roule in Place de la Concorde. There’s a great view over the city from top, even on a rainy day, in my experience

He said they were going to kiss while up the Eiffel Tower.

He said they were going to kiss while up the Eiffel Tower.

Check out some fun souvenirs in Galleries Lafayette

Check out some fun souvenirs in Galleries Lafayette

Institute de France is one of the grand buildings along the Seine

Institute de France is one of the grand buildings along the Seine

Check out the Louvre.

Check out the Louvre.

Sit in a sidewalk cafe and watch the world go by for a bit

Sit in a sidewalk cafe and watch the world go by for a bit

Cobbled streets of Montmartre can lead you anywhere.

Cobbled streets of Montmartre can lead you anywhere.

Fab Photo Friday – Don’t feed the animals

There are signs up all around most zoos warning you against feeding the animals, unless, of course, they provide you with something that’s animal-friendly. When I was visiting Vancouver about 10 years ago, we went to the Vancouver Zoo. It’s a really lovely zoo, too, with large natural enclosures for most of the animals. I really like giraffes so was excited to see them ambling around their space. When I spotted someone picking up twigs and leaves and feeding one, I *had* to do it too! I figured it would be ok, as it’s their natural food. It wasn’t like I was trying to feed them popcorn or chocolate or something!

I picked up a few twigs and went over by the fence.  I wasn’t afraid, exactly. I’ve never heard of anyone being savaged by a giraffe, after all. But you don’t realize how HUGE those animals are  until you see a head the size of a horse coming down at you from out of the sky and see that great, long, BLACK tongue snake out at your hand to gently remove the stick. Oh, Wow!

zoofeedinggiraffe

That’s me, in full “EEK” mode watching for the safety of my fingers carefully!

zoogiraffefeeding

Ah, well that’s all right, then! Isn’t she lovely! (I’m pretty sure it wasn’t a male, they were even bigger and taller!)

Fab Photo Friday – Harrogate

 

Betty's Tea Room, Harrogate

Betty’s Tea Room, Harrogate

HHarrogate, in Yorkshire, U.K. is known as a “spa” city. Although it’s mineral rich waters were discovered in the 16th century, it boomed in Georgian times as a destination where people could take the waters and obtain all manner of cures. Today, the city is a popular destination and has lovely, elegant architecture and lots of nice pubs and restaurants and shops, many with the original storefronts. We saw several with windows that curved around the corner of the shop rather than being fit into a frame for the front and sides.

Betty’s Tea Room was established nearly a century ago. They serve a very civilized tea with scrumptious cakes and pastries and they do a very nice lunch as well. It’s not cheap but it’s one of those nice touristy things to do. There are other Betty’s establishments including one in the city of York but this one is the original one though not the original location in Harrogate.

The Royal Pump Room is early Victorian and is famed for the sulfur waters over which it sits. It was hugely popular in it’s day with up to 200,000 visitors or more during it’s height in the 1920s. It is now a museum showing some interesting artifacts of various medical “cures” and methods as well as Victorian items on display.

Harrogate Pump Room Museum

The Royal Pump Room Museum, Harrogate

Harrogate Pump Room Sign

Detail on the Royal Pump room building

Detail on the Royal Pump room building

Fab Photo Friday – Manchester city centre

In honour of the upcoming journey to Manchester next week, I give you a few photos from the city centre.

This is the square next to the “Triangle” shops (on the right). The building used to be the old corn market. The wheel and sculpture are fairly new and there’s a ground level sculpture/fountain that you can’t see. the new buildings behind the wheel are Selfidge’s and Marks and Spencer, a new flagship store built after the IRA bomb damaged the old one in 1996. Between the damage in this area caused from that (though not one person was killed) and the millenium, the city centre of Manchester has been given quite a facelift.

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Manchester’s city centre, the Triangle shops on the right, the Wheel and Exchange square

These were in a window in a shop in the Triangle, taken from the car as we drove by!

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On the main street, Deansgate, there’s a pub called Moon Under Water. It’s one of the Wetherspoon’s franchise. They often take old buildings, renovate them and open pubs. This one used to be a movie cinema. It’s a very large pub with an upstairs and large back are past the open area where you come in. Upstairs outside the toilets you will find this lovely stained glass window. There are also framed photos of famous Mancunians including the final photo here of famed fictional characters from the longest currently running television show in the world, Coronation Street and it’s where I’m going to be this time next week!

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Stained glass in Moon Under Water, Deansgate

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From Coronation Street, on the air since Dec. 9, 1060. Two of the original characters and arguably two of the most famous. Played by Violet Carson OBE (Ena Sharples) and the late Pat Phoenix (Elsie Tanner)